The most valuable lessons I’ve learned since becoming a minimalist 

Minimalism made me reevaluate what time means to me and how much of it is wasted doing essentially nonsense. 

Minimalism makes you wonder, do I enjoy spending all my free time cleaning and doing maintenance? Do I like spending so much time in stores? Do I enjoy working so many hours and/or side jobs to pay for stuff that is mostly wants or impulse buys instead of needs?

The beauty of minimalism is that it doesn’t force us to do anything, it’s all about the freedom to choose and the power that comes from making decisions based on awareness instead of being ruled by unconscious impulses and societal conditioning (hello neuromarketing).

I don’t know why it took me so long to realize this, but having fewer dishes or less clothes doesn’t allow it to pile up. If you want a clean plate or outfit, you have to keep them clean.

About that, here’s a short and yet perfect story on how to deal with laundry, by Matt d’Avella.

To take this a step further, since becoming a minimalist, I noticed that I now need less self-discipline, since there is no other option than to wash whatever is dirty, and since there isn’t much to maintain and keep up with.

This could be summed up in an extremely simple reasoning: minimizing entails having less work to do.

How ? A simple equation:

Less stuff = less work = less stress

When my go-to isn’t buying more or calling anyone for help, I become more resourceful and creative with what I have. 

The other amazing thing about minimalism is that the momentum of enthusiasm created by downsizing/organizing one area of your physical life carries over into others.  You want to experience the thrill of accomplishment again and again.

Moreover, as a minimalist, I’ve stopped ignoring my problems, and instead started focusing on them, and minimizing them.

Less stuff also means less decisions, which undoubtedly leads to less decision fatigue.

Once you do not use up your decision making power in non-essential things (such as what to wear or which cup to use) you have more energy in making more important decisions.

A personal uniform could be the answer for some, not necessarily something that works for me though ^^

Last but not least, I think minimalism promotes self-mastery.

Minimalism helps you question everything and consider how temporary the ecstasy of (insert thing) will be. 

I think that’s deep. 

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